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Lobbyist Money Help  

Missouri Seniors Get Free Advice

October 21, 1999
By: Kristin Marinec
State Capital Bureau

Some Missouri students are receiving help with managing their money--and the cost?--Nothing. Kristin Marinec has more from Jefferson City.

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The Missouri Department of Higher Education is giving all seniors in high school free issues of Life 101 magazine.

The magazine offers financial advice to students who are about to enter college and the workforce.

Department spokeswoman CariAnne Cutshall expresses concerns about students who are not used to handling their own money.

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Contents: Missouri Department for Higher Education spokeswoman CariAnne Cutshall says there are so many students who don't know how to manage money and yet they get so many credit card offers in college.

Cutshall says the magazine will also offer descriptions of state financial assistance programs.

Reporting from the state capitol, I'm Kristin Marinec.


Missouri officials are urging seniors to continue their education after high school. They believe the message is so important that they are giving away a helpful tool. Kristin Marinec has more from Jefferson City.

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The Missouri Department for Higher Education is giving all high school seniors free copies of Life 101 magazine.

The magazine focuses on money management, college preparation, and financial aid.

Department spokeswoman CariAnne Cutshall says she hopes the magazine will help students plan for the future.

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Contents: Missouri Department of Higher Education spokeswoman CariAnne Cutshall says many times students don't apply for college or student loans on time and end up borrowing loans just to pay for school.

Cutshall says as the demand for loans increases, teaching students how to manage money is becoming more important.

Reporting for the state capitol, I'm Kristin Marinec.