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Senator says disruptive fans need to be held accountable

May 14, 2003

Date: May 14, 2003

By: Nishi Gupta

State Capital Bureau

The Missouri Senate is considering a bill that would punish fans who run onto fields in the middle of sporting events.

Nishi Gupta has the story.

Bill sponsor Senator Matt Bartle of Jackson County is saying enough is enough. He says fans who jump onto fields of professional and college-level athletic games should be penalized. He says not only do they cause an interference, but sometimes attack the players, coaches and umpires. Bartle says this behavior is unsafe and simply cannot continue.

Actuality:BARNMG1.wav
RunTime: 11
OutCue: "for the worst".
Contents: "It used to be that they would run harmlessly across the field, interrupt the game for however many people are assembled. But, it's taken a wicked turn for the worst."

TEXT

Bartle says it is important to ensure that all fans have an enjoyable experience when they're watching games. Under the bill, unruly fans could be fined up to 5,000 dollars and get a class A misdemeanor. The bill would also punish those who participate in human cloning and give the police authority to hold arrested people for 24 hours without a warrant.

From Jefferson City, Nishi Gupta, KMOX News.


A bill that is moving through the Missouri legislature targets fans who jump onto the playing fields of sporting events.

Nishi Gupta has the story.

Fans who decide they want to run on the field may want to think again. Bill sponsor Senator Matt Bartle of Jackson County says his bill could punish unruly fans by slapping them with a five thousand dollar fine and a class A misdemeanor. He says the behavior causes a disruption and undermines the safety of players, coaches and umpires.

Actuality: BARNMG4.wav
RunTime: 15
OutCue: "viewing public."
Contents: "We don't want to create a situation where people are playing baseball in a cage, you know, that holds the fans back. That would destroy the experience a lot for the viewing public."

Bartle says the penalties would apply to both collegiate and professional sporting events. His bill also includes legislation that allows police to hold suspects for 24 hours without a warrant and charges against people who participate in human cloning.

From Jefferson City, Nishi Gupta, KMOX News.


The Missouri Senate is considering a bill that would allow state police to arrest and hold a person for 24 hours - all without a warrant.

Nishi Gupta has the story.

Right now, Missouri law allows for people to be held 20 hours. However, Bill sponsor Matt Bartle of Jackson County says the extra time is necessary and can help the police do their job better.

Actuality:BARNMG3.wav
RunTime: 15
OutCue: "release them."
Contents: "That's to give law enforcement the ability to go in, to gather the evidence, and time to evaluate how dangerous somebody they're holding is before they have to release them."

Proponents of the bill say it is often difficult for authorities to gather enough information and charge someone within 20 hours. But opponents of the bill say if police can't find enough evidence in 20 hours, they probably don't have a reason to hold the person in the first place.

The bill also includes legislation that punishes people involved with human cloning efforts and fans who run onto the playing field of college and professional sporting events.

From Jefferson City, Nishi Gupta, KMOX News.