From Missouri Digital News: https://mdn.org
MDN Menu

MDN Home

Journalist's Creed

Print

MDN Help

MDN.ORG: Missouri Digital News
MDN Menu

MDN Home

Journalist's Creed

Print

MDN Help

MDN.ORG Mo. Digital News Missouri Digital News MDN.ORG: Mo. Digital News MDN.ORG: Missouri Digital News
Lobbyist Money Help  

The EPA says 11 cities in Missouri are in danger of sanitary sewer overflows

November 11, 2003
By: Stephanie Hockridge
State Capital Bureau

The EPA says 11 cities in Missouri are in danger of sanitary sewer overflows, but Missouri can't fix the problems just yet. Stephanie Hockridge has the story.

Story:
RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

Sanitary sewer overflows, or SSO's, occur when the same pipe system handles both rain and sewage.

When there is too much rain, the system overflows and raw sewage is dumped into rivers and waterways.

SSO's are filled with levels of pollutants, which can threaten public health.

Richard Kunst, a spokesmen for the Department of Natural Resources says Missouri is waiting for a federal proposal before they can fix local problems.

Actuality:
RunTime:
OutCue:
Contents:

"WE PROPOSED A NUMBER OF YEARS AGO TO A CONTROL POLICY THAT ACTUALLY MADE IT TO THE MISSOURI CLEAN WATER COMMISSION, BUT, AS THAT WAS BEING DEVELOPED, THE EPA ANNOUNCED THAT THEY WERE GOING TO COME UP WITH A NATIONAL PROGRAM OF REGULATION."

Story:
RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

The department pulled back their original proposal and is waiting to see what the feds come up with.

Kunst says that the proposal is expected in the next year or so.

From the state Capitol, I'm Stephanie Hockridge. Date:11/06/03

By: Stephanie Hockridge

State Capital Bureau

The EPA says 11 cities in Missouri are in danger of sanitary sewer overflows and the price to fix them is through the roof. Stephanie Hockridge has the story.

Story:
RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

Sanitary sewer overflows, or SSO's, occur when the same pipe system handles both rain and sewage.

When there is too much rain, the system overflows and raw sewage is dumped into rivers and waterways.

SSO's are filled with levels of pollutants which can threaten public health.

But, Nancy Stoner the director of the Clean Water Act says that the price to fix SSO's is extremely high because fixing this problem is not a government priority.

Actuality:
RunTime:
OutCue:
Contents:

"THE PRICE TAG FOR OVERALL NATIONS SEWAGE TREATMENT IS HIGH AND IT'S HIGH IN PART BECAUSE WE HAVE NOT INVESTED ENOUGH ON A YEARLY BASIS, SO THAT THE SYSTEM IS NOT BEING ADEQUATELY MAINTAINED AND IS DETERIORATING AND BECAUSE OF THAT, THE COST OF FIXING IT CONTINUES TO GROW OVERTIME."

Story:
RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

Missouri is still waiting for the EPA to issue their National Program of Regulation to help fix this problem.

The program is expected to be released in the next year or so.

From the state Capitol, I'm Stephanie Hockridge.Date:11/6/03

By: Stephanie Hockridge

State Capital Bureau

The EPA says that 11 cities in Missouri are in danger of sanitary sewage overflows, which can threaten public health. Stephanie Hockridge has the story.

Story:
RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

Sanitary sewage overflows, or SSO's, occur when the same pipe system handles both rain and sewage.

When there is too much rain, the system overflows and raw sewage is dumped into rivers and waterways.

SSO's are filled with concentrated levels of pollutants and this threatens the publics health.

Nancy Stoner is the director of the Clean Water Project with the Natural Resources Defense Council.

She says that exposure to these type pollutants will make people sick.

Actuality:
RunTime:
OutCue:
Contents:

"WHEN THE PUBLIC BECOMES EXPOSED EITHER THROUGH DIRECT EXPOSURE TO THE WATER OR THROUGH DRINKING CONTAMINATED TAP WATER, VARIOUS DIFFERENT WAYS, THOSE DISEASES CAN MAKE PEOPLE GET DIARRHEA, VOMITING, RESPIRATORY ILLNESS OR EVEN MORE SERIOUS ILLNESSES LIKE HEPATITIS A OR DYSENTERY."

Story:
RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

Missouri is still waiting for the EPA to issue their National Program of Regulation to help fix this problem.

The program is expected to be released in the next year or so.

From the state Capital, I'm Stephanie Hockridge.