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House passes tougher nursing home regulation--but without pricey provision

April 29, 2003
By: Johnathan Woodward
State Capital Bureau

Missouri's House has passed changes that lawmakers say will crack down on bad nursing homes.

Johnathan Woodward has the story from Jefferson City.

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The Senior Care and Protection Act increases fines on nursing homes that violate state standards--and makes it easier for the state to investigate problems.

But the House did not pass a provision that would adjust how much nursing homes get reimbursed from Medicaid.

The bill's handler in the House, Mike Sutherland of Warren County, says the 80 million dollar pricetag of that part of the bill would have kept the safety and enforcement issues from passing:

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Now, the Senate has to decide whether to agree with the House version and send the bill to the governor--or work out the differences in committee.

In Jefferson City, Johnathan Woodward.


Missouri's House has passed higher fines and increased enforcement against problem nursing homes--but left out a provision with an 80 million dollar pricetag.

Johnathan Woodward has more from Jefferson City.

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The Senior Care and Protection Act gives the state more leeway to investigate dangerous conditions in nursing homes.

It also ups the maximum fine for serious violations from 1-thousand to 10-thousand dollars per day.

Representative Mike Sutherland of Warren County handled the bill.

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But the House cut a provision that would adjust how much Medicaid reimbursement went to nursing homes--and cost the state 80 million dollars.

Sutherland says that would have kept the entire bill from passing.

The bill now goes back to the Senate, which can send it on to the Governor or work out any differences with the House.

In Jefferson City, Johnathan Woodward.