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Lobbyist Money Help  

Legislature passes DNA profiling bill

May 11, 2004
By: Cliff Judy
State Capital Bureau

The Missouri Legislature passed a bill requiring all convicted felons and sex offenders to provide DNA samples. Cliff Judy has more from the state Capitol.

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Opponents say DNA profiling is wrong and every person deserves respect and protection, even criminals.

House Judiciary Chair Richard Byrd says he disagrees and Missouri needs the bill requiring convicted felons to provide a DNA sample.

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Contents: Byrd says, "Let's talk about whose body we need to protect. Those innocent women whose bodies are being defiled, and we may have that perpetrator behind bars on some other minor offense."

Supporters of the bill say it could lead to additional convictions in unsolved crimes. From the state Capitol, I'm Cliff Judy.

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The Missouri Legislature passed a bill to require a DNA sample from all convicted felons and sex offenders. Cliff Judy is in Jefferson City with the story.

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Opponents of the bill say it goes too far and every person, regardless of their criminal status, deserves protection from big government.

Representative Wes Shoemyer says the bill is too broad.

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Contents: Shoemyer says, "But how far do we go? How many rights do we take away to say yes or no? Why don't we put something on here that says, 'Hey, I'm guilty. I don't want to be tested. Leave me alone.'"

The bill's supporters say it would make Missouri's citizens safer and help solve some unsolved crimes. From the state Capitol, I'm Cliff Judy.

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The Missouri Legislature's bill to require DNA samples from convicted felons. It also allows inmates found innocent to receive compensation. Cliff Judy has more from the state Capitol.

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Under the bill, people who have been exonerated would receive $50 for every day they spent in jail.

Representative Betty Thompson says it shouldn't cost the state much because these incidents are rare.

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Contents: Thompson says, "I think it's only about two or three people in the whole state of Missouri. If you all can't take care of two or three people in the state of Missouri, well my God, how can you take care of thousands and thousands of other people that we're asking you to help?"

Money for the payments will come from the DNA profiling analysis fund set up by the bill. From the state Capitol, I'm Cliff Judy.