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A House bill will give motorcyclists the option of not wearing a helment.

April 4, 2006
By: Amy Becker
State Capital Bureau

A bill in the Missouri House will give motorcyclists over twenty one the freedom to choose whether or not they want to wear a helment.

Amy Becker has more from Jefferson City.

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The bill went through first round approval on Tuesday and is on the agenda to be perfected.

Buchanan Representative Robert Schaff, sponsor of the bill, says the bill will also prohibit any state money to be used for the treatment of injuries of motorcycle riders who were not wearing a helment.

The bill was met with mixed reviews from many House members. Representative Mark Wright questioned Schaff's motives.

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Contents: "I don't think you're genuine. I don't think it's genuine. I think you have an alterior motive here with this amendment, that's what I believe."

Current law requires all motorcyclist to wear helments at all times.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Amy Becker.

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Motorcyclists might be able to have a choice on whether or not to wear protective headgear due to a new bill in the Missouri House.

Amy Becker reports from the state Capitol.

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The bill exempts motorcyclists twenty one years and older from wearing a helment.

Some representatives said that the motorcyclists freedom of choice would cause health care costs for all residents to increase.

Representative Robert Schaff, the bill's sponsor, says motorcyclists injured while not wearing a helment will not get state money for medical care.

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Contents: If we are going to make it that you have the freedom to not ride without a helment, you should have the personal responsibility to not have the rest of us pay for it. It's that simple.

Schaff says the bill is not ignoring safety but simply improving individual liberties.

From Jefferson City, I'm Amy Becker.