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Drug Prices Online

March 14, 2006
By: Hayley Salvo
State Capital Bureau
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INTRO: Today you can compare the cost of car insurance and plane flights online, but soon Missourian's might be able to shop for the cheapest prescription drugs. In Jefferson City, Hayley Salvo has more.

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Senate Pro tem Mike Gibbons has proposed a bill that would list the prices for the 50 most frequently prescribed medicines online. Gibbons is following the lead of states such as Florida and Maryland who already offer such Web sites. He says the information will make for a more informed consumer.

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"It gives a tremendous amount of power back into the hands of patients, the consumers of this state who are really paying the price for health care, so they can know and understand the full cost and implications of what's going on out there with pharmaceuticals."

Gibbons estimates setting up the Web site will cost the state around $300,000 dollars but contends that's a small cost for what Missourians stand to benefit. The Web site could be up and running as soon as next year.

In Jefferson City, I'm Hayley Salvo.

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INTRO: Bargain shopping is part of the American culture so it's no surprise a Missouri senator wants to provide residents with access to cheaper prescription drugs. In Jefferson City, Hayley Salvo explains.

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Senate Pro tem Mike Gibbon's bill would make the prices for the 50 most frequently prescribed medicines available online. Gibbons is following the lead of other states such as Maryland and Florida that have shown positive results.

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"What they're finding in Florida is by posting the cost that it's starting to bring the prices down because there' competition."

Gibbons estimates it will cost the state around $300,000 dollars to set up the Web site but contends that's a small price compared to what Missourian will benefit. For those without access to the internet, a 1-800 number will be created with the same information. The Web site could be running as soon as next year.

From the state capitol, I'm Hayley Salvo.