A bill in the Senate will start a rating system for child care centers
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A bill in the Senate will start a rating system for child care centers

Date: February 21, 2007
By: Amy Becker
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: A bill in the Missouri Senate will implement a five star ratings system for child care providers.

Amy Becker has more from Jefferson City.

The rating system looks at staffing ratios, staff education, quality and content of the facility, and the ability of the center to get parents involved in their children's lives.

The ratings will range from licensing at one star and accreditation at five stars.

The bill's sponsor, Republican Senator Charlie Shields, says families deserve to know the quality of care their child will receive.

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OutCue: SOC
Actuality:  CHARLIE.WAV
Run Time: 00:07
Description: One, you want quality in early childhood education and then you want parents to be able to understand what the local quality is and make a decision.

The process will be conducted by the Department of Social Services and the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.
From the state Capitol, I'm Amy Becker. ###########3 An overabundance of amendments forced a child care ratings bill to be held over in the Missouri Senate. Amy Becker has more from the state Capitol. The bill originally developed a quality rating system for child care facilities. This changed after multiple amendments proposed an increase in child care subsidies.

The bill's sponsor, Republican Senator Charlie Shields, says the amendments should be considered by the Appropriations committee and were too much for the bill to handle.

Actuality:  SHIELDS1.WAV
Run Time: 00:08
Description: I didn't think it was very fruitful, it wasn't helpful to the process.  It probably would've put the entire bill in jeopardy ultimately if that amendment had gone on.

 

The bill would originally cost one million dollars but the extra amendments raise the cost to thirty to forty million dollars.

Reporting from Jefferson City, I'm Amy Becker.