Prevention of Adverse Incidents
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Prevention of Adverse Incidents

Date: April 8, 2008
By: Erika Navarrete
State Capitol Bureau
Links: SB 916

Erika Navarrete April 08, 2008 Prevention of Adverse Incidents SB 916 Intro: A bill that proponents say would reduce the risk of future adverse incidents in hospitals faced no opposition at the Senate Health Committee Hearing.

Erika Navarrete (Nahv-ah-rett) has more from Jefferson City.

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The bill would require hospitals to report adverse incidents to a federally sanctioned Patient Safety Organization which would then provide the hospitals with education on patient safety improvements.

Richard Royer, former chair of the Patient Safety Organization, said he encourages the reporting of medical errors.

 

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Description: "We can learn why errors occur, what errors occur and prevent them from occurring in the future. The entire purpose of this effort is prevention and reduction of medical errors on the long term."
 
The organization would also prepare annual reports regarding the number of adverse events without identifying the facility in which the incident occurred.
 
No one testified against the bill and the committee took no immediate action.
 
Reporting from the State Capitol, I'm Erika Navarrete, KMOX News.

Descript: A bill that proponents say would reduce the risk of adverse incidents in hospitals faced no opposition at the Senate Health Committee Hearing.

Intro: Missouri legislators were urged to consider a bill that proponents say would reduce the risk of adverse incidents in hospitals.

Erika Navarrete (Nahv-ah-rett) has more from the State Capitol.

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The bill would require hospitals to report medical errors to the federally sanctioned Patient Safety Organization without having to identify the facility in which the adverse events occurred.
 
Richard Royer, former chair of the Patient Safety Organization said that the number of incidents reported would increase.
 
Actuality:  ROYER3.WAV
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Description: "Information is protected in a confidential setting that the providers, that is physicians and hospitals well over the course of time, be much more encouraged to step forward, report errors and work on those problems."

Royer also said this would prevent errors in the future and also save approximately eight million dollars on a state wide basis.
 
No one testified on bill and the committee took no immediate action.
 
Reporting from Jefferson City, I'm Erika Navarrete, KMOX News.