Missouri's presidential vote could change
From Missouri Digital News: https://mdn.org
MDN Menu

MDN Home

Journalist's Creed

Print

MDN Help

MDN.ORG: Missouri Digital News
MDN Menu

MDN Home

Journalist's Creed

Print

MDN Help

MDN.ORG Mo. Digital News Missouri Digital News MDN.ORG: Mo. Digital News MDN.ORG: Missouri Digital News
Lobbyist Money Help  

Missouri's presidential vote could change

Date: November 7, 2008
By: Rachel Glaser
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: The election may be over, but Missouri's presidential vote is still up for debate.

John McCain has conceded and Barack Obama is officially president-elect, but there are still 7,000 uncounted votes in Missouri.

Rachel Glaser (GLAZ-R) has more with the story from Jefferson City.

RunTime:0:30
OutCue: SOC

Missouri is a bellwether state, with the impressive record of voting for the president-elect since 1904 except in the election of 1956 and now the historical election of 2008.

John McCain won the state of Missouri by about 6,000 votes, but the uncounted provisional ballots could give Missour's vote to Obama.

Provisional ballots are cast by people whose status as a registered voter could not be verified.

Secretary of State's director of communication, Ryan Hobart explains the process of counting provisional ballots.

 
Actuality:  HOBART2.WAV
Run Time: 00:11
Description: All the local election officials around the state are in charge of going through and determining if the provisional ballots in their area should count. They have two weeks from the day after the election to go through those and determine which should count.


Missouri's voters broke records on Tuesday with 2.9 million casting their ballots.

Reporting from the State Capitol, I'm Rachel Glaser.

 


Intro: Missouri could be changing from a red to blue state in this year's presidential election.

John McCain has conceded, and Barack Obama is officially president-elect,  but Missouri still has 7,000 uncounted votes.

RunTime:0:48
OutCue: SOC

Missouri has been called a "political phenomenon" for it's consist bellwether status.

Missouri has only not voted for the president elect twice in the last 104 years. Once in 1956, and now in the historical election of 2008.

John McCain won the state by a mere 6,000 votes, but uncounted provisional votes could give the state to Obama.

Secretary of State's director of communication, Ryan Hobart explains the importance of Missouri's bellwether status.

Actuality:  HOBART4.WAV
Run Time: 00:10
Description: I think Missouri voters just feel like they are very in tune with the issues around the country that matter to everyone. And take pride in being a state that kind of veers the nation.
 
Local election officials are in charge of verifying provisional votes. The state has two weeks after election day to count the votes.

Reporting from the State Capitol, I'm Rachel Glaser