One expert says Missouri's "unprecedented" rainfall is cause for concern to those who plan to burn their leaves.
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One expert says Missouri's "unprecedented" rainfall is cause for concern to those who plan to burn their leaves.

Date: October 29, 2008
By: Christine Slusser
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: One expert says Missouri's "unprecedented" rainfall is cause for concern to those who plan to burn their leaves.

Christine Slusser has more from the state Capitol.

RunTime:0:37
OutCue: SOC

For those looking to burn leaves in their yards, the 50 inches of rainfall seen since January spells trouble.

University of Missouri's extension climatologist, Pat Guinan, says the rain keeps people indoors and makes the leaves too wet to burn.

Actuality:  GUIN1.WAV
Run Time: 00:13
Description: "I would think there would be fewer windows of opportunity to burn leaves or to work with compost. Fortunately though, October though, for the most part, with the exception of northwestern Missouri, October is running a little bit below normal in the precip. category."

Guinan says this weekend is the prime time for action if you plan to burn leaves because there is no forecast for rain.

From the state Capitol, I'm Christine Slusser.


Intro: Rain is not the only thing making it difficult to burn leaves this season.

Christine Slusser has more from the state Capitol.

RunTime:0:36
OutCue: SOC

While Missourians have seen less rainfall this month, burning leaves is still a problem.

Pat Guinan, the University of Missouri's extension climatologist, says other obstacles like trapped moisture could cause leaf burning problems.

 

Actuality:  GUIN2.WAV
Run Time: 00:13
Description: "We have also seen cooler temperatures, we've seen shorter daylight hours, and so that leads to a little bit slower in regards to evaporation of moisture and I would think that it has provided some problems."

Guinan says because there is no rain expected this weekend, it would be the best time to attempt to burn or compost.

From the state Capitol, I'm Christine Slusser.


Intro: A lead expert encourages people to compost this fall instead of trying to burn wet leaves.

Christine Slusser has more from the state Capitol.

RunTime:0:44
OutCue: SOC

Missouri's 50 inches of rain this year is making it difficult to burn autumn leaves.

That is quite alright for Andrea (AN-DREE-AH) Morrow, spokesperson for the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, who says composting is much better for the environment and your soil.

Morrow also says if you plan to compost, be sure to get rid of rotten materials.

Actuality:  MORROW1.WAV
Run Time: 00:15
Description: "You want to avoid anything that has come in contact with meat, fish, or dairy products. If you've got plants that have become diseased or infested with insects, weeds that are easily spreadable like morning glory, buttercup..."

Morrow says throwing leaves in a compost heap is much easier than trying to burn them while they are wet.

From the state Capitol, I'm Christine Slusser.