Proposition A the good and the bad.
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Proposition A the good and the bad.

Date: October 8, 2008
By: Jon Cecero
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: An initiative to eliminate gambling loss limits could mean an economic boost for Missouri but doubters say the proposition misleads voters and is potentially dangerous to residents.

Jon Cecero(SIS-er-oh) has more from Jefferson City. RunTime:2:50
OutCue: SOC

Government staff estimates Proposition A would generate between 105 and 130 million dollars each year for education.

The campaigns Spokesperson Scott Charton said the initiative would give voters an opportunity to limit the number of state wide casinos.

Charton said the proposition will rake in new money for Missouri's economy and schools.

He said Missouri may lose millions of dollars to neighboring states if the initiative is not passed.

Actuality:  CHARTON3.WAV
Run Time: 00:12
Description: "Estimated a single casino planned from the Kansas speedway will siphon a hundred and seventy-four million dollars from Missouri we just can't afford a boarder raid from Kansas like this, we need to fix this competitive disadvantage."

One of the main opponents to Charton's Proposition A is Executive Director Evelio (EV-vee-lee-oh) Silvera (Sill-VER-ah) of the St. Louis based organization Casino Watch.

Silvera accused Proposition A of deceiving Missouri residents.

He said the elimination of the state's 500 dollar loss limit is a front for casinos in operation to establish a monopoly.

The initiative restricts the number of casinos to those already built or in construction.

The proposition would also eliminate player tracking cards which hold information about the player's gambling patterns and history.

Silvera said Missouri State Troopers use the cards to track criminal activity.

He went on to say eliminating the cards could lead to a statewide crime increase.

Actuality:  SILVERA1.WAV
Run Time: 00:11
Description: "So I agree with their attorney it is all about gambling it has nothing to do with education or the economy and if we pass proposition A it can seriously endanger many Missourians."
 
Charton disagrees with Silvera's comment.
 
He says there is no proof that player identification cards deter crime or gambling problems.
 
Democratic State Senator Harry Kennedy of the Missouri Joint Committee on Gaming and Wagering takes a more neutral approach to the potential bill.
 
He said he would like to see loss limits removed from the state.
 
Actuality:  KENN0.WAV
Run Time: 00:14
Description:"It's not workable from what I have been told and what i have read and it really dissuades people who are the heavy hitters from gaming and in the state of Missouri."  
 
The Senator said he is not worried about a casino monopoly.
 
He said Missouri has reached its threshold of casinos and satisfied with the current number.
 
Supporters expressed optimism that the proposition would benefit the state's economy and schools but also rid the state of outdated laws.
 
Opponents of the bill say it is just a way for casinos to create a monopoly and have little intention of helping the state of Missouri.

Reporting from the State Capitol, I'm Jon Cecero.


Intro: An initiative to eliminate gambling loss limits could mean an economic boost for Missouri but doubters say the proposition misleads voters and is potentially dangerous to residents. Jon Cecero(SIS-er-oh) has more from Jefferson City. RunTime:20:09
OutCue: SOC

One of the main opponents of Proposition A is Executive Director Evelio (EV-vee-lee-oh) Silvera (Sill-VER-ah) of the St. Louis based organization Casino Watch.

Silvera accused Proposition A of deceiving Missouri residents.

He said the elimination of the state's 500 dollar loss limit is a front for casinos in operation to establish a monopoly.

The initiative restricts the number of casinos to those already built or in construction.

The proposition would also eliminate player tracking cards which hold information about the player's gambling patterns and history.

Silvera said Missouri State Troopers use the cards to track criminal activity.

He went on to say eliminating the cards could lead to a statewide crime increase.

Actuality:  SILVERA1.WAV
Run Time: 00:11
Description: "So I agree with their attorney it is all about gambling it has nothing to do with education or the economy and if we pass proposition A it can seriously endanger many Missourians."
 
Government staff estimates Proposition A would generate between 105 and 130 million dollars each year for education.

The campaigns Spokesperson Scott Charton said the initiative would give voters an opportunity to limit the number of state wide casinos.

Charton said the proposition will rake in new money for Missouri's economy and schools.

He said Missouri may lose millions of dollars to neighboring states if the initiative is not passed.

Actuality:  CHARTON3.WAV
Run Time: 00:12
Description: "Estimated a single casino planned from the Kansas speedway will siphon a hundred and seventy-four million dollars from Missouri we just can't afford a boarder raid from Kansas like this, we need to fix this competitive disadvantage."

Charton disagrees with Silvera and says there is no proof that player identification cards deter crime or gambling problems.

Democratic State Senator Harry Kennedy of the Missouri Joint Committee on Gaming and Wagering takes a more neutral approach to the potential bill.
 
He said he would like to see loss limits removed from the state.
 
Actuality:  KENN0.WAV
Run Time: 00:14
Description:"It's not workable from what I have been told and what i have read and it really dissuades people who are the heavy hitters from gaming and in the state of Missouri."  
 
The Senator said he is not worried about a casino monopoly.
 
He said Missouri has reached its threshold of casinos and satisfied with the current number.
 
Supporters expressed optimism that the proposition would benefit the state's economy and schools but also rid the state of outdated laws.
 
Opponents of the bill say it is just a way for casinos to create a monopoly and have little intention of helping the state of Missouri.

Reporting from the State Capitol, I'm Jon Cecero.


Intro: A Casino Watchdog Organization wants Missourians to know the truth behind the gambling loss limits initiative.

Jon Cecero (SIS-ER-O) has more from Jefferson City.

RunTime:0:43
OutCue: SOC

An anti-gambling organization is working with pro gambling cities to fight Proposition A.

Evilo Silvera of Casino Watch said current Missouri casinos want proposition A to pass not for the states interest but for their own financial benefit.

Actuality:  SILVERA3.WAV
Run Time: 00:11
Description: "For pro-gambling folks and anti-gambling folks to be on the same side of an issue telling Missouri voters to vote no on prop A that goes to tell you how deceptive prop A really is."

Proposition A supporters said the initiative is designed to increase Missouri's revenue and set up a fund for education.

Silvera and pro gambling communities Sugar Creek and Cape Girardeau are afraid the new initiative might create a monopoly on casinos. 

Reporting from the State Capitol, I'm Jon Cecero.


 


Intro:  A Missouri casino giant says a yes on Proposition A helps Missouri compete economically with other states while funding schools.

Jon Cecero (SIS-ER-O)has more from Jefferson City.

RunTime:0:40
OutCue: SOC

Ameristar Casinos Vice President and Chief Governmental Affairs Officer Troy Stremming said casinos are not the only ones benefiting from Proposition A.

Stremming said the new ballot initiative will bring new economic hope for schools in Missouri.

 

Actuality:  TROY0.WAV
Run Time: 00:13
Description: "Obviously in tough economic times and Missouri being in the bottom third in the country as far as education from the K-12 ranks I think it could be very beneficial to the state."

Opponents of the proposition said the education fund is just a front for current casinos to establish a monopoly in Missouri.

Stremming said restricting new casinos would ensure that Missouri does not turn into Las Vegas.

Reporting from the State Capitol, I'm Jon Cecero.