More Rain, More Bacteria
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More Rain, More Bacteria

Date: September 16, 2008
By: Christine Slusser
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: Bacteria increases after an extra rainy season, especially in Missouri's rivers and streams.

Christine Slusser has more from the capitol.

RunTime:0:39
OutCue: SOC

This weekend's heavy rain is causing water experts to warn of potential contamination.

Top water expert Dale Blevins from The U.S. Geological Survey says after heavy rainfall toxin levels in the Missouri River rise.

 
Actuality:  BLEV4.WAV
Run Time: 00:08
Description: even without the help of sewers, bacteria rises with heavy rainfall.
 
Blevins also says that a reason sewage may not affect the Missouri River strongly is because of its strong flow.
 
An organization that promotes healthy waters wants to pass a federal law where sewage plants will be required to notify the public if there is an overflow.

From the capitol, I'm Christine Slusser


Intro: After recreational water activities on the Missouri River it is important to wash-up because of the rise in bacteria.

Christine Slusser has more from the capitol.

RunTime:0:48
OutCue: SOC

The Department of Natural Resources encourages people to do recreational activities in the Missouri River, but the current rainy season increases bacteria levels.

DNR's spokesman Larry Archer says tests of rivers have concluded that bacteria increases in bodies of water after rain.

Archer said practicing simple hygiene will keep you safe.

Actuality:  ARCH1.WAV
Run Time: 00:14
Description: Wash hands so you don't accidentally ingest things on you from the river.

Archer also said it is important to be familiar with the area you are using.

A top water expert from the U.S. Geological Survey says the agency does not recommend swimming in rivers after rainstorms.

From the state capitol, I'm Christine Slusser.