Mushrooms Growing
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Mushrooms Growing

Date: September 23, 2008
By: Christine Slusser
State Capitol Bureau

Intro:  Heavy rains lead to harmful fungus that pet owners need to watch out for.

Christine Slusser has more from the state capitol.

RunTime:0:39
OutCue: SOC

The recent increase in rain has caused poisonous mushroom growths to jump.

Columbia veterinarian Julie Neil said it is hard to tell whether a pet ate a mushroom because the symptoms are vague.

Actuality:  NEIL2.WAV
Run Time: 00:08
Description: "Most of the time I would say you wouldn't know unless the owner has actually seen the dog ingest the mushroom because there is no specific test for mushroom toxicity."

Neil says symptoms include drooling, tremors, and difficulty breathing.

A spokesman from the Missouri Mycological (MY-KAH-LOGICAL) Society, a group devoted to fungus, said if a poisonous mushroom is found the best way to dispose of it is to pick it up and throw it away far from the animal's reach.

From the state capitol, I'm Christine Slusser.


Intro: Experts warn pet owners to watch their animals more closely because the recent rainfall caused a high growth in mushrooms, including poisonous ones.

Christine Slusser has more from the state capitol.

RunTime:0:36
OutCue: SOC

With the heavy rain Missouri experienced it is important to make sure the lawn and backyard are clear of poisonous mushrooms which pets may try to eat. 

Brad Bomanz from the Missouri Mycological (MY-KAH-LOGICAL) Society, a group which focuses on fungus, does not recommend killing the mushrooms unless they are deadly.

 

Actuality:  MANZ1.WAV
Run Time: 00:09
Description: "If there's white ones growing on the grass, especially large white ones with a tall stem, those are poisonous."

Bomanz said if the mushrooms are not harmful, it is alright to leave them because they help trees grow.

From the state capitol, I'm Christine Slusser.


Intro: Experts warn Missouri's wet weather is growing threat to the life of your pets outdoors.

Christine Slusser has more from the capitol.

RunTime:0:36
OutCue: SOC

The recent heavy rainfall led to high mushroom growth, including those that are poisonous and harmful to humans and their pets.

The Missouri Mycological (MY-KAH-LOGICAL) Society's Head of Research Brad Bomanz who specializes in fungus said to watch out for large, white mushrooms with long stems.

 

Actuality:  MANZ2.WAV
Run Time: 00:09
Description: "For eating purposes it is better to throw it away because it's free anyway rather than get sick or possibly even, you know, cause death."


Bomanz also said it is helpful to buy a mushroom field guide that will help identify the safe from the deadly.

From the state capitol, I'm Christine Slusser.


Intro: Experts warn Missouri's rain is causing a growth that is harmful to pets.

Christine Slusser has more from the capitol.

RunTime:0:41
OutCue: SOC

The heavy rainfall caused many mushrooms to grow in lawns and backyards.

Some of those mushrooms are poisonous and deadly to pets.

Columbia veterinarian Julie Neil said monitoring pets while they are outside is essential because the symptoms of a pet that ate something like a harmful mushroom are hard to spot.

 

Actuality:  NEIL3.WAV
Run Time: 00:13
Description: "Any kind of salivation, drooling, tremors, just lethargy in general.  They can have some pretty vague symptoms...difficulty breathing."

Neil said unfortunately one of the only ways to find out if a mushroom has been eaten is by performing an autopsy.

From the state capitol, I'm Christine Slusser.


Intro:  Heavy rains lead to harmful fungus that pet owners need to watch out for.

Christine Slusser has more from the state capitol.

RunTime:0:39
OutCue: SOC

The recent increase in rain has caused poisonous mushroom growths to jump.

Columbia veterinarian Julie Neil said it is hard to tell whether a pet ate a mushroom because the symptoms are vague.

Actuality:  NEIL2.WAV
Run Time: 00:08
Description: "Most of the time I would say you wouldn't know unless the owner has actually seen the dog ingest the mushroom because there is no specific test for mushroom toxicity."

Neil says symptoms include drooling, tremors, and difficulty breathing.

A spokesman from the Missouri Mycological (MY-KAH-LOGICAL) Society, a group devoted to fungus, said if a poisonous mushroom is found the best way to dispose of it is to pick it up and throw it away far from the animal's reach.

From the state capitol, I'm Christine Slusser.


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