Republicans give up 'Previous Question' power
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Republicans give up 'Previous Question' power

Date: February 6, 2008
By: Emily Rau
State Capitol Bureau

 Intro: A group of Missouri Senators agreed to discredit the only enemy of a filibuster for the remainder of this year's legislative session. Emily Rau (R-Ow!) has more from Jefferson City. RunTime:1:28
OutCue: SOC
Actuality:  CROWELL.WAV
Run Time: 00:08
Description: I think it's much to-do about nothing. And unfortunately sometimes in election years people start making mountains out of mole hills.


That's Republican Senator Jason Crowell reacting to a bi-partisan agreement made Tuesday night.

A group of three Democratic senators and three Republican senators agreed not to support any Previous Question motions, which eliminates the only obstacle of a filibuster in the Senate.

 A previous question motion was last used in 2007's session to stop a Democratic filibuster on the MOHELA bill.  

Reporting in Jefferson City, I'm Emily Rau.


Intro: A small group of Missouri senators reached a bi-partisan agreement on the issue of the fillibusters only enemy:  the previous question.

Emily Rau (R-Ow!) has more on the agreement from the State Capitol.

RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

Three Democratic senators met with three Republican senators Tuesday night to discuss the use of the previous question motion. When called, the motion ends discussion on the current bill and prompts an immediate vote among senate members. Minority Leader Maida Coleman said the main problem before the agreement was communication between the parties.
 
Actuality:  MAIDA1.WAV
Run Time: 00:11
Description: We have had an issue in the past where the democrats don't feel our voices being heard and with the Republicans feel they don't have to have our voices heard.

 Coleman cited the agreement as a turning point where the two parties finally listened to each other.
Reporting from Jefferson City, I'm Emily Rau.