House Perfects Public Prayer Amendment
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House Perfects Public Prayer Amendment

Date: February 19, 2008
By: Reed Erickson
State Capitol Bureau
Links: HJR 55

Intro: The Missouri House gave first-round approval to a constitutional amendment that would require government agencies, including schools, to allow voluntary prayer in their facilities.

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The proposed Constitutional amendment could require public officials to allow non-disruptive prayer in state facilities. Supporters argue the measure is crucial to protect religious freedom from continuing judicial attack. But on the other side, Kansas City area Democrat Trent Skaggs says more protection is not necessary.
Actuality:  SKAGGS1.WAV
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Description: I think it is pretty presumptuous that we are clarifying the United States Constitution.  I think it has done a pretty good job for us over the last 200 years.

The bill faces a final House vote before it is sent to the Senate. 

At the Capitol, I'm Reed Erickson

 


Intro: The House gave preliminary approval to a resolution that would require all public schools post a copy of the Bill of Rights.

Reed Erickson reports from Jefferson City.

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OutCue: SOC

The House gave preliminary approval to a bill that Western Missouri Representative Mike McGhee says will make sure that schools allow non-disruptive prayer.

The measure includes language requiring all state sponsored schools display a copy of the Bill of Rights in a conspicuous place. 

St. Louis County Republican Jim Lembke says he wants to make sure that the right to pray freely is protected.

 

Actuality:  PRAYER1C.WAV
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Description: We do have the right to pray in public places. And it can not be infringed.  I think we can't make it any clearer than to put this before the people, the voters of Missouri.

But on the other side critics say this is simply election year politics.

The opposition says the U.S. Constitution already protects religious freedom.


The bill still faces final house vote before it is sent to the senate.

If it clears the legislature it would need voter approval before it would become part of the state constitution.

At the Capitol, I'm Reed Erickson.