The Environmental Protection Agency has begun implementing a federal regulation that will require contractors to be certified to work with dangerous lead-based paint
MDN Menu
MDN.ORG Mo. Digital News Missouri Digital News MDN.ORG: Mo. Digital News MDN.ORG: Missouri Digital News

The Environmental Protection Agency has begun implementing a federal regulation that will require contractors to be certified to work with dangerous lead-based paint

Date: October 22, 2008
By: Christine Slusser
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: The Environmental Protection Agency has begun implementing a federal regulation that will require contractors to be certified to work with dangerous lead-based paint.

Christine Slusser has more from the state Capitol.

RunTime:0:50
OutCue: SOC

Before 1978, there was no ban on putting lead in paint for homes and toys.

A federal regulation going into effect in 2010 will require contractors who work in these older homes be certified so they don't make harmful mistakes.

Deputy Director of Pollution Prevention and Toxins for the Environmental Protection Agency, Wendy Hamnett, says the unprecedented regulation has been in the works for years.

The regulation will require contractors to be EPA-certified before working in older homes.

Actuality:  NETT1.WAV
Run Time: 00:14
Description: "There are several aspects to the work practices. One is containing the area where the work's being done so that, you're not, you're minimizing the amount of  dust that might contain lead that's being spread into other parts of the home."

With the new regulation, the contractors will also be taught proper clean-up procedures.

From the state Capitol, I'm Christine Slusser.


Intro: A lead (LEDD) expert warns children are being poisoned by their own homes.

Christine Slusser has more from the state Capitol.

RunTime:0:48
OutCue: SOC

Houses built before 1978 likely contain lead paint which is dangerous to young and old alike.

The Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA, has a new federal regulation regarding lead which will be in full effect by 2010.

The regulation will make contractors working in these older homes be EPA-certified.

Christine Dustin, Regional Lead (LEDD) Coordinator for EPA's Region 7 which covers Missouri, says children in these homes are more vulnerable to the dangers of lead.

Actuality:  DUSTIN2.WAV
Run Time: 00:12
Description: "The focus of this new rule and all the work that we do is children under six years old because their developing nervous systems are more susceptible to lead poisoning than older children."

Dustin says parts of the regulation are already in play but it will not be in full effect until April 2010.

From the state Capitol, I'm Christine Slusser.

 


Intro: This week is the Environmental Protection Agency's "Let's Wipe Out Lead Poisoning Week" which brought attention to a federal regulation regarding lead poisoning.

Christine Slusser has more from the state Capitol.

RunTime:0:10
OutCue: SOC

A federal regulation will be in full effect in April 2010 which will require those who work in homes built before 1978 be certified by the Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA.

Deputy Director of Pollution Prevention and Toxins of EPA, Wendy Hamnett, says the new rule will place unprecedented demands on contractors.

Actuality:  NETT2.WAV
Run Time: 00:15
Description: "There are procedures for cleaning up after the work is done to make sure that you are really getting up all of the fine dust so that when the family goes back into that area that's been worked in children and other members of the family aren't being exposed to levels of  dust that could cause problems."


Hamnett encourages people to use lead safe practices like sealing cabinets or relocating while work is being done to protect their families.

From the state Capitol, I'm Christine Slusser.


Missouri Digital News is produced by Missouri Digital News, Inc. -- a non profit organization of current and former journalists.