In moving to an English only Missouri government, the state is doing well in complying with existing adult English education legislation.
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In moving to an English only Missouri government, the state is doing well in complying with existing adult English education legislation.

Date: October 21, 2008
By: Joshua Skurnik
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: Which a chance for Missouri to become an English only state government this election season, a decade old bill requiring state agencies to provide adult English education is reviewed for compliance.

Joshua Skurnik (SCUR-nic) has more from Jefferson City.

RunTime:1:06
OutCue: SOC

According to State Director of Adult Education and Literacy for the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Ron Jewel, Missouri offers plenty of resources for those who want to learn English.

Ten years ago a bill passed making the Department of Education provide assistance and materials to agencies who provide English language instruction.

He says that the bill then was irrelevant as his department was already well within compliance.

Actuality:  JEWEL1.WAV
Run Time: 00:30
Description: we were, pretty much in compliance with the senate bill even when it was passed as we continued to provide English as a second language services throughout the state

Jewel says that his department has always been in line with legislation mandating English language education services.

Reporting from the state capital, I'm Joshua Skurnik


Intro: The existence of a proposed amendment on this year's ballot making the Missouri government English only brings into question the state's efforts to provide English language education to adults.  

Joshua Skurnik has more from Jefferson City. 

RunTime:0:42
OutCue: SOC

Executive Director of Missouri Immigration and Refugee Advocates Jennifer Ronahan says the problem with state English literacy programs is more than not being enough to meet the demand.

What needs to be addressed is assisting non-English speakers in taking part in important everyday activities while learning.

Actuality:  ROFANAN1.WAV
Run Time: 00:13
Description: Better job of making sure that people have interpretors in political settings, and important social settings, like parent teacher conferences.

Ronahan said that immigrants generally want to learn English to fully participate in their community and obtain good jobs.

Reporting from the State Capital, I'm Joshua Skurnik.