Drugs in High School Targeted
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Drugs in High School Targeted

Date: January 15, 2008
By: Rebecca Layne
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: High school students could face random drug testing if the senate judiciary chair gets his way. RunTime:0:27
OutCue: SOC

A bill heard by the Senate Judiciary Committee would require random urine tests for student athletes whose teams make it to post-season play.

 
The bill's sponsor is the committee's chair -- Matt Bartle:
 
 
Actuality:  BARTLE1.WAV
Run Time: 00:05
Description:  I think that 2007 may very well be remembered as the year of the steroid.

Bartle's committee took no immediate action on the bill.
 
But since the Kansas City area Republican chairs the Judiciary Committee, he can assure an early vote.  Reporting from the state Capitol, Rebecca Layne, KSMU News.
Intro: A bill sponsored by Republican Senator Matt Bartle would call for random drug testing for high school athletes. RunTime:0:46
OutCue: SOC

According to Bartle, the bill would call not only for testing for anabolic steroids but for other illegal substances as well.

Athletes who test positive for illegal substances will be prohibited from participating in sports for the rest of that year and the following one.

 

Actuality:  BARTLE2.WAV
Run Time: 00:14
Description: Our naivetÚ about steroid use has been abruptly dislodged over the past 13 months, dislodged with admissions of athletes who were formerly our fondest heroes and heroines.


Many school districts are against the bill out of fear of what the testing will cost them.  Currently, a single test can cost two hundred dollars, funds which Bartle says can be accessed through membership fees to the Missouri State High School Activities Association.

But since the Kansas City area Republican chairs the Judiciary Committee, he can assure an early vote.  Reporting from the state Capitol, Rebecca Layne, KSMU News.