Supreme Court ruling brings some bipartisan agreement
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Supreme Court ruling brings some bipartisan agreement

Date: April 28, 2008
By: Stephanie Levy
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: Voter I-D requirements have been a partisan issue, but Monday's Supreme Court decision upholding Indiana's photo I-D requirement for voters actually brought Democrats and Republicans together on one issue.

Stephanie Levy (Lee-vee) has more from Jefferson City.

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Both parties agree the Supreme Court's ruling won't affect Missourians. The Missouri Supreme Court struck down a similar requirement in 2006, saying it violated the Missouri Constitution.

Since the 2006 ruling dealt with the Missouri Constitution, the U-S Supreme Court's ruling on the U-S Costitution doesn't change state law.

Republican Senator Delbert Scott, the 2006 legislative sponsor, says an amendment to the state Constitution is now the only way of mandating photo I-D's.

Actuality:  SCOTT1.WAV
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Description: A photo ID is the gold standard. You have to have it to get on an airplane, to rent a movie, to cash a check. And if it works in commerce, it certainly is the key issue in guaranteeing that the person who's standing before you at the ballot box is the person they say that they are.


Scott says photo I-D's would cut down on election fraud.

But Senate Minority Leader Maida Coleman called photo I-D's a partisan attempt by Republicans to keep minorities, poor people, and other groups who tend to vote Democratic, away from the polls.

Reporting from the state capitol, I'm Stephanie Levy.


Intro: Missouri State officials say the U-S Supreme Court's ruling allowing Indiana's photo I-D requirement won't impact Missourians, but it has renewed the debate between Republican and Democratic officials.

Stephanie Levy (Lee-vee) has more from Jefferson City.

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Secretary of State Robin Carnahan and Attorney General Jay Nixon would not comment on the ruling. Carnahan's office issued a press release stating her "disappointment" with the Supreme Court's decision.

Senate Minority Leader Maida Coleman says more Democrats will come out in opposition to the ruling when it becomes an issue for Missourians.

Actuality:  COLE2.WAV
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Description: Missouri's just in a better position when it comes to what we were trying to promote regarding voter identification and how bad the legislation is for this state.

Coleman says photo I-D requirements hurt older and minority voters who tend to vote Democratic. But Republican Senator Delbert Scott says the measure would prevent voter fraud.

Reporting from Jefferson City, I'm Stephanie Levy.


Intro: While the U-S Supreme Court's ruling upholding Indiana's photo I-D requirement for voters won't impact Missourians, it didn't stop Democrats and Republicans from renewing debate over this highly partisan issue.

Stephanie Levy (Lee-vee) has more from the State Capitol.

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The Missouri Supreme Court ruled in 2006 that photo I-D requirements violated the Missouri Constitution.

The sponsor of the 2006 bill says the U-S Supreme Court's ruling shows Missouri lawmakers were headed in the right direction.

But Senate Minority Leader Maida Coleman says Republican claims of voter fraud are exaggerated, and their real reason for pushing this mandate is to keep minorities, seniors, and disabled people away from the polls.

Actuality:  COLE1.WAV
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Description: I've never seen a dog walk in to pick up their ballot to vote. So dogs and dead people do not walk into polling places. So there is not the fraud there that the Republicans claim that there is.


Coleman says lawmakers need to look at voter registration practices and petitioners in the state if they really want to cut down on election fraud.

Reporting from the State Capitol, I'm Stephanie Levy.