Controversial bill seeks to strengthen seat belt laws
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Controversial bill seeks to strengthen seat belt laws

Date: March 10, 2009
By: Brian Jarvis
State Capitol Bureau
Links: HB 665

Intro: For the twelfth year in a row, witnesses lined up Tuesday to ask Missouri lawmakers to do something about drivers who refuse to strap on their seat belts.

Brian Jarvis in Jefferson City has more.  

RunTime:0:42
OutCue: SOC

Jefferson City Republican Representative Bill Deeken says his grandchildren are alive because they wore seatbelts in a car that was hit by an Amtrak train.

Deeken sponsors a bill that would give police authority to pull over drivers if they see them not wearing their seat belts.

 

Actuality:  DEEKEN.WAV
Run Time: 00:08
Description: "Will it save every life? No. There's going to be people killed wearing seat belts. But it will help. And that's what we've got to get done here today."

Deeken says if the bill becomes law this year, the Missouri Department of Transportation would receive more than 16 million dollars in federal aid.

No one spoke against the bill, but one transportation committee member says the answer is education, not a new law.

From Jefferson City, I'm Brian Jarvis.


Intro: Despite an army of witnesses that stormed the Missouri Capital, some lawmakers are against a bill that would put more punch in seat belt laws.

Brian Jarvis in Jefferson City has more.  

RunTime:0:33
OutCue: SOC

Witness after witness told the Missouri Transportation Committee Tuesday they believe police should be allowed to pull over drivers who aren't wearing seat belts.

But Lee's Summit Republican Representative Brian Yates is not convinced.

 

Actuality:  YATES4.WAV
Run Time: 00:08
Description: "It opens the door as far as probable cause stops on motorists. There weren't really any clear answers today of how law enforcement would enforce this law."

No one spoke against the bill, which would have to clear both the House and Senate by the end of June in order to be eligible for federal funds.

From Jefferson City, I'm Brian Jarvis.