Omnibus education bill sparks debate on bullying and sexuality
From Missouri Digital News: https://mdn.org
MDN Menu

MDN Home

Journalist's Creed

Print

MDN Help

MDN.ORG: Missouri Digital News
MDN Menu

MDN Home

Journalist's Creed

Print

MDN Help

MDN.ORG Mo. Digital News Missouri Digital News MDN.ORG: Mo. Digital News MDN.ORG: Missouri Digital News
Lobbyist Money Help  

Omnibus education bill sparks debate on bullying and sexuality

Date: May 13, 2009
By: Rebecca Beitsch
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: The House debate over an education bill turned to a discussion of homosexual safety in schools. Rebecca Beitsch (BYE-tch) has more from the state Capitol. RunTime:0:39
OutCue: SOC

The debate was whether to create a list for groups protected from bullying. Democrats argued that if it wasn't in writing, students wouldn't be protected.

But Republican Darrell Pollock said that creating a list would be too exclusive.

Actuality:  POLL.WAV
Run Time: 00:13
Description: "There's no way possible that we could come up with a complete list of the things that we would say that could not be bullied, be classified as bullying. So The very simple way to do it is that all bullying is created equally."

The bullying amendment was voted down, and sponsor Sara Lampe said that some of her colleagues don't want to admit homosexuality is a real thing.

From the state Capitol, I'm Rebecca Beitsch, Newsradio 1120 KMOX.


Intro: The Missouri House removed provisions protecting certain groups, including homosexual, from bullying in school. Rebecca Beitsch (BYE-tch) has more from the state Capitol. RunTime:0:51
OutCue: SOC

The House voted down an amendment extending protection from bullying to a list of students, including homosexuals. Some Republicans said creating a list made the protection too narrow.

Republican Will Kraus accused amendment sponsor Sara Lampe of having "a hidden homosexual agenda."

But Lampe said the only way to stop persecution of homosexuals in the school system is to have it in writing.

Actuality:  LAMPE.WAV
Run Time: 00:21
Description: "We had a pretty wide-spread use of the N word, and it was readily used in our society until legislators stood up and said 'That will not be allowed.' Until we say that with this issue as it relates to sexual orientation, it will continue to be allowed."

The education bill as a whole was laid over on the calendar.

From the state Capitol, I'm Rebecca Beitsch, Newsradio 1120 KMOX.