The Senate approved a bill to give young girls more information about the HPV virus and immunization
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The Senate approved a bill to give young girls more information about the HPV virus and immunization

Date: March 5, 2009
By: Jennifer Meckles
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: Young girls are now one step closer to cancer prevention after the Senate approved a bill Wednesday that would increase awareness about the HPV virus.

Jennifer Meckles has more from Jefferson City.

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The bill would require the State Health Department to contact female students by mail about the virus and its connection to cervical cancer - the number two cause of cancer in women.

Bill sponsor Jackson County Democratic Senator Jolie Justus says the legislation will help save lives.

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Description: "The thought is that with this vaccine, and continual pap smears and other testing, we could actually eliminate cervical cancer within a generation."

The information packet would also offer information to help students find ways to pay for the immunizations.

If students aren't able to afford the immunization, the bill would allow for using programs like Medicaid to cover the costs.  

From the State Capitol, I'm Jennifer Meckles.


Intro: A bill achieved Senate approval Wednesday, giving young women more information about HPV.

Jennifer Meckles has more from the State Capitol.

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The bill would require information to be mailed to sixth-grade female students about the, Human Papillomavirus, HPV, and immunization options.

The virus has been linked to cervical cancer -- the number two cause of cancer in women.

Bill sponsor Jackson County Democratic Senator Jolie Justus, said the information targets middle-school girls for a reason.

 

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Description: "The vaccine is recommended for young women, I believe, between the ages of 11 and 24, and so that was about the age where we thought it would be good to let the parents know about the availability of it."

The bill would offer alternatives to students who cannot afford the immunizations -- like Medicaid -- to cover the costs.

Reporting from Jefferson City, I'm Jennifer Meckles


Intro: The Senate passed a bill Wednesday that would help the fight against cervical cancer.

Jennifer Meckles has more from Jefferson City.

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OutCue: SOC

The bill would require the State Health Department to mail information to female middle-school students about the Human Papillomavirus, or HPV, and ways to prevent it.

Democratic Senator Jolie Justus sponsors the bill.

Last year she proposed a similar measure which was also approved by the Senate but it never made it out of the House.

Justus says she is more confident this year.

Actuality:  JUSTUS04.WAV
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Description: "I've got folks from the Missouri Family Network and other more conservative, fundamental, family-focused organizations who are actually in favor of this bill because they see it as one of the most, if not the most, family friendly vaccine policy that the state has ever put forward."

Justus also said students and their parents have a choice whether or not to get immunized.

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Description: "They don't have to report to the state that they've gotten it, that they haven't gotten it. There's no requirement that they receive the vaccine. They wont be prevented from going to school. No one will know. It is just to let them know that it's out there."

The information would include where to get the shot and offer alternatives for students who can't afford the vaccine.

Reporting from the State Capitol, I'm Jennifer Meckles.