Dry Summer means Less Wildlife
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Dry Summer means Less Wildlife

Date: September 25, 2012
By: Jamie Ries
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: 
Rain boosts fish population in Missouri
RunTime:  0:36
OutCue:  SOC

Wrap: As temperatures increased throughout the summer, fish populations decreased.

Spokesperson Joe Jerek of the Department of Conservation says that during extended periods of high heat and drought, water temperatures also rise and fish cannot survive.

He says more rain means more water and more water means more fish.

Actuality:  FISHCUT.WAV
Run Time:  00:09
Description: "We've seen a good number of fish kills over this past summer, but again, that also has gotten better with cooler temperatures and with at least some scattered rainfall."

Jerek says rivers and streams are still a bit low, but better than they were during summer.

Reporting live from the State Capitol, I'm Jamie Ries.   

Intro: 
Missouri forests looking green again after summer drought
RunTime:  0:38
OutCue:  SOC

Wrap: High temperatures during the 2012 Missouri summer raised concern for less leaves and more fires.

The Missouri Department of Conservation issued an immediate open fire ban on all conservation areas on June 29, 2012.

Department of Conservation's spokesperson Joe Jerek says today that things are looking up for both forests and campers.

Actuality:  FORCUT2.WAV
Run Time:  00:09
Description: "Since we've been getting some rain, things have greened up quite a bit. For example, we have lifted the fire bans, or burn bans, in our conservation areas."

Jerek says Missouri's rain is making forests greener and the greener they are, the lesser the threat of fires.  

Reporting live from the State Capitol, I'm Jamie Ries.  

Intro: 
Water levels are slowly increasing in Missouri
RunTime:  0:36
OutCue:  SOC

Wrap: The hot summer might be over, but water levels seize to rise.

USDA Executive Director Bob Garino says the bad news is that water is still low in ponds and has not been re-filled.

He says rains absorbed into the ground instead of filling up the ponds.

Actuality:  USDA.WAV
Run Time:  00:13
Description: "The water is a big problem, I would say still the main problem. And we're getting into the time now into the fall where soon they[cattle] will be feeding on hay anyway, but at least now they have a little bit of pasture to eat off of."

Garino says with more rain comes more water and with more water, lower prices for hay.

Reporting from the State Capitol, I'm Jamie Ries.


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