Conservation Department Says 2012 Drought Behind Tree Wood Rot
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Conservation Department Says 2012 Drought Behind Tree Wood Rot

Date: September 15, 2015
By: Jill Ornitz
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: 
The Missouri Department of Conservation says the rot that's appearing in trees across the state was likely caused by the drought of 2012.
RunTime:  0:32
OutCue:  SOC

Wrap: Conservation Department Forest Pathologist Simeon Wright says trees that are under stress tend to be vulnerable to tree rot and fungus growth.

The drought of 2012 put a large portion of Missouri's trees under that stress.

Actuality:  WRIGHTA.WAV
Run Time:  00:10
Description: "We think a lot of that probably goes back to the drought that we had in 2012. We had a very severe drought a few years ago and that's quite stressful for trees."

Wright says wounds to a tree that allow fungus to get into the tree also contribute to instances of tree rot.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Jill Ornitz.

Intro: 
The Department of Conservation says instances of tree rot appearing in Missouri could be a product of the massive 2012 drought.
RunTime:  0:38
OutCue:  SOC

Wrap: Conservation Department Forest Pathologist Simeon Wright says the 2012 drought put trees in Missouri under stress, making them more vulnerable to tree rot.

The rotting and fungus associated with that kind of damage can appear in trees years after the intial period of stress.

Actuality:  WRIGHTB.WAV
Run Time:  00:14
Description: "Many trees may not show symptoms right away, but over time, a few years later, there's been more time for wood decay fungi to develop and other disease and insect issues to occur."

Wright says wounds to a tree that allow fungus to enter the tree can lead to tree rot.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Jill Ornitz.

Intro: 
According to the Department of Conservation, instances of tree rot appearing in Missouri could have been caused by the 2012 drought.
RunTime:  0:37
OutCue:  SOC

Wrap: When trees begin to rot, they may become a safety concern.

Conservation Department Forest Pathologist Simeon Wright says rotting trees are not structurally sound.

Actuality:  WRIGHTC.WAV
Run Time:  00:16
Description: "That indicates that the tree may becoming a hazard because it's not structurally sound anymore and it could break over in a storm or something like that and cause damage to property or to people that are near the tree."

Wright says the department recommends people call a certified arborist if they are concerned that a tree on their property may be rotting.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Jill Ornitz.


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