Missouri's Warm Winter Leads to Transportation Savings
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Missouri's Warm Winter Leads to Transportation Savings

Date: March 22, 2016
By: Jack Morrisroe
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: 
The Missouri Department of Transportation saved millions from the lack of snowfall this winter.
RunTime: 0:40
OutCue: SOC

Wrap: When asked to describe the state's winter, Climatologist Bryan Peake of the Midwestern Regional Climate Center said it was quite unseasonable.

Actuality:  PEAKE.WAV
Run Time: 00:01
Description: It was wet, and it was warm.

 

The lack of snowfall led to savings for the transportation department.

The Missouri Department of Transportation saved about $20 million on snow removal to date, according to Chief Financial Officer Roberta Broeker. The amount is about half of what is typically spent each winter.

Each transportation district would be able to move their allotted snow removal budget to important, local maintenance projects once the likelihood of wintry precipitation is near zero.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Jack Morrisroe

Intro: 
Missouri's unseasonably mild winter will have uncertain effects on the state's agricultural yields.
RunTime: 0:43
OutCue: SOC

Wrap: Climatologist Bryan Peake, with the Midwestern Regional Climate Center, said the past winter was quite unseasonable for the state.

Actuality:  PEAKE1.WAV
Run Time: 00:04
Description: The entire winter was considered to be warmer and wetter.

Peake also said the El Ni˝o year led to lower heating costs, but had an uncertain effect on the state's agriculture yields.

Patrick Westhoff, director of the University of Missouri's Agricultural Research Institute, agreed that the winter's effect on Missouri's agriculture is unclear. He could pass no judgement on whether the year's crop yields would increase or decrease from last year.

However, transportation maintenance costs decreased by $20 million with the warm winter.

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Jack Morrisroe.