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Eagleton testifies for death penalty moratorium

February 23, 2000
By: Aaron Cummins
State Capital Bureau

A former Missouri Attorney General and U.S. Senator testified in favor of a bill that would place a moratorium on the death penalty last night/Wednesday night at the Capitol. Aaron Cummins has more from Jefferson City--

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Tom Eagleton was Missouri's Attorney General in the early 60s.

Eagleton says during that time he realized the death penalty isn't a deterrent to criminals.

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Contents: Eagleton says when a person is going to commit a crime they don't think about the punishment beforehand.

Eagleton says even people in favor of the death penalty should support this bill.

He says that's because of recent discoveries in Illinois and the moratorium there.

Opponents of the bill say they're in favor of a study of Missouri's death penalty, but don't think the state should stop executions in the meantime.

From the capitol, Aaron Cummins, KMOX-News.


A well-known Missouri politician spoke in favor of a bill to study Missouri's death penalty and impose a moratorium last night/Wednesday night in Jefferson City. Aaron Cummins has more--

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Former U.S. Senator and Missouri Attorney General Tom Eagleton says Missouri needs to look at what happened in Illinois.

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Contents: Eagleton says Gov. George Ryan is a conservative Republican and pro-death penalty, but he took 13 people off death row because of questions about their guilt or innocence.

Eagleton says while he was attorney general he realized the death penalty isn't a deterrent to criminals.

But, opponents of the bill say the state shouldn't stop executions while studying the system.

They support the investigation, but say a moratorium goes too far.

From the capitol, Aaron Cummins, KMOX-News.