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Republicans Attack Carnahan's Meth Laws

September 11, 2000
By: Rodger Oakes
State Capital Bureau

In the growing controversy over methamphetamine in the U.S. Senate race, Republicans attacked Governor Mel Carnahan and the weakness of Missouri's current anti-meth laws.

Rodger Oakes has more from Jefferson City.

Story:
RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

Republican Chris Koster, Cass County prosecutor, led the onslaught with the support of a group of law enforcement officials and legislators.

Koster says the Missouri Highway Patrol has received less than 5% of monies its requested over the past 6 years.

Actuality:Koster
RunTime: 11s
OutCue: "response has been woefully inadequate"
Contents: The Missouri Highway Patrol has recoginzed the meth crisis, but the budgetary response has been woefully inadequate.

Koster says the six million dollars the state has received to fight meth came from Senator John Ashcroft's work in the federal government.

But, Carnahan has defended his record citing the fact that Missouri has one of the toughest meth laws in the nation, signed into law only 2 years ago.

Supporters of Carnahan have been critical of an advertisement by Ashcroft's campaign which knocks Carnahan's anti-meth law.

From Jefferson City, I'm Rodger Oakes.


The U.S. Senate campaign is heating up over attacks on Governor Mel Carnahan's anti-meth laws.

Rodger Oakes has more from Jefferson City.

Story:
RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

Governor Carnahan's laws are not tough enough according to the Republican Prosecutor for Cass County Chris Koster.

Actuality:Koster02
RunTime: 12s
OutCue: "production, possession, or distribution"
Contents: Despite the fact that this is one of the worst drug problems in the past 25 years, legislation still lacks mandatory sentences for production, possession, or distribution.

Koster, joined by a group of legislators and law enforcement officials said current Missouri law allows person's possessing over 400 grams of meth to avoid any jail time.

Senator Ashcroft has drafted legislation to make the possession of 5 grams of meth a crime with mandatory prison time.

Still just 2 years ago, Governor Carnahan signed a bill which Democrats say is one of the toughest in the nation.

From Jefferson City, I'm Rodger Oakes.