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The Governor lobbied members of his own party to ensure passage of his transportation plan

April 5, 2001
By: Renny MacKay
State Capital Bureau

The governor spent the morning lobbying memembers of his party to vote for his transportation plan.

Renny MacKay has the story from Jefferson City.

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It was anticipated that the vote to pass the governor's plan would be close, so when Democratic members of the Black Caucus voiced opposition to the bill, the governor jumped into action to try and address their problems.

St. Louis Representative Quincy Troupe met with the governor this morning and told him...

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Contents: He says he is totally disappointed with the bill, but will vote for it because it does include multi modal transportation which is critical to the city's residents.

Troupe says he favors the public transportation part of the multi modal plan.

No one from the caucus voted against the plan...and Troupe says they did get some individual promices from the governor.


Before the Democrat leadership in the House brought the governor's plan to the floor for a final vote, the governor met with disgruntled members of the Black Caucus to try and ensure their support.

Renny MacKay has more from the state capitol.

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The final vote on the transportation plan was 83 to 71 in favor of a tax increase to fund highway improvements. But, members of the Black Caucus voiced their problems with the bill to the governor before the vote.

Representative Quincy Troupe from St. Louis City says his constituents didn't benefit from the 15 year plan and won't benefit from this plan.

Actuality: troup3
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Contents: He says they got the shaft in 1992 and they're getting the shaft now. And that's a tough way to start the new millenium.

He did vote for the bill because he says the public transportation part of the bill is good for St. Louis City, but it could be better.


The governor spent the/yesterday morning meeting with House Democrats to ensure he had enough votes to pass his transportation plan out of the House and send it on to the Senate.

Renny MacKay tells us if that work paid off for the governor.

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Only a few Democrats did cross the aisle and voted against the governor's plan, but a few Republicans also broke ranks to vote for the bill, ensuring its passage.

This was good news for Governor Bob Holden, who watched the vote from inside the House.

Actuality: hold1
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Contents: He says he's pleased with the House leadership for passing a good bill.

Holden also says there is something in this bill that should ease people who are concerned about how the state handled the 1992 15 year plan.

Actuality:hold2
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Contents: He says people can vote on this bill and they couldn't in 1992.

The vote would come in November of 2001, if the bill passes the Senate.


The House passed the governor's 670 million dollar transportation plan, after the governor lobbied dissenting members of his party.

Renny MacKay has more from the state capitol.

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Despite strong opposition from Republicans the governor's transportation plan passed the Missouri House.

Democratic members of the Black Caucus did say they have problems with the bill, but did vote in favor of it after speaking with the governor.

The bill now heads to the Republican controlled Senate, where it faces a lot of opposition.

Governor Holden says he's optimistic about the bill surviving.

Actuality: hold3
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Contents: He says no one expected it to get this far, it's something Governor Carnahan worked on and never got anywhere so it isn't any issue to tackle.

The House passed the bill 83 to 71.