From Missouri Digital News: https://mdn.org
MDN Menu

MDN Home

Journalist's Creed

Print

MDN Help

MDN.ORG: Missouri Digital News
MDN Menu

MDN Home

Journalist's Creed

Print

MDN Help

MDN.ORG Mo. Digital News Missouri Digital News MDN.ORG: Mo. Digital News MDN.ORG: Missouri Digital News
Lobbyist Money Help  

The two biggest opponents of a new Cardinal stadium, still aren't happy with the changes to the stadium funding bill

April 17, 2001
By: Renny MacKay
State Capital Bureau

The two biggest opponents of state funding of a new Cardinal stadium voice their oppinion on the most recent changes to the stadium funding bill.

Renny MacKay has the story from Jefferson City.

Story:
RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

When the Cardinal stadium bill came out of the House committee it had several extra provisions that weren't contained in the original bill. For example the bill now limits the amount the state pays towards the stadium each year, directs profits from the naming rights to the Stadium Authority to help pay for the stadium and it adds a protection against the Cardinals selling the franchise and leaving the state to cover all the costs.

The bill's sponsors made these changes in response to the objections of opponents of the plan like Representative Jim Murphy, who still isn't satisfied.

Actuality: murf1
RunTime:
OutCue:
Contents: Murphy says this is like being covered by a swarm of mosquitos and having someone take two away.

He thinks it's a bad plan to give millionaires money, and says the Cardinal owners have a bad track record of using tax breaks to improve the value of a franchise and then selling it.

He says the owners did this with the Texas Rangers.

From the state capitol, I'm Renny MacKay.


Larry Rice, gubornatorial candidate and pastor, visited the state capitol today/Tuesday to speak against the Cardinal stadium funding bill, and to give out a newspaper he has funded.

Renny MacKay has more from Jefferson City.

Story:
RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

Rice says he came to the state capitol to drum up support for his newspaper he's distributing around the state. It outlines his arguments against the stadium plan.

He says he and fellow stadium opponent Representative Jim Murphy also gave the papers out at the Cardinals home game on Saturday.

Actuality:lar1
RunTime:
OutCue:
Contents: He says this is a way to get information to the people who are usually not involved in politics, but don't support the stadium.

The paper contains articles by both Green Party Presidential candidate Ralph Nader and State Republican Senator Sarah Steelman.

From the state capitol, I'm Renny MacKay.


Reverand Larry Rice, speaking at the state capitol, says the people of St. Louis don't care if the Cardinals move out of the city.

Renny MacKay has more on the story from the state capitol.

Story:
RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

Standing on the steps of the capitol building Reverand Rice, one of the biggest opponents of a new stadium in St. Louis says the state has other more pressing needs than a new stadium. He also says the issue won't be put to a vote of the people of St. Louis City because they wouldn't support a new stadium.

Actuality:lar5
RunTime:
OutCue:
Contents: He says we need to remove the chicken little syndrome that we should be afraid of the Cardinals relocating. He says they won't move or even if they move to St. Louis county the people of St. Louis won't be upset.

Rice says the Cardinals have been bad to employees in the city and there is no reason to think things would change.

In Jefferson City, I'm Renny MacKay.


The Cardinals stadium bill has been changed to address some of the problems people concerned with the plan have, but the two biggest opponents of the plan say those changes aren't enough.

Renny MacKay has more from Jefferson City.

Story:
RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

Reverand Larry Rice and St. Louis County Representative Jim Murphy gathered on the steps of the state capitol to speak to the press about their problems with the stadium plan and the changes to the bill.

Rice says the change giving money from the naming rights to the state still gives the Cardinals too much power because they have final say over any deal. He also says he has a problem with the new cap of 9.5 million dollars in state money per year going to the organization.

Actuality:lar3
RunTime:
OutCue:
Contents: Rice says it is better than no cap at all, but he wants the money to be spent elsewhere.

The bill now also contains a provision requiring the Cardinals to pay if they breach the lease provision.

From the state capitol, I'm Renny MacKay.