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Lobbyist Money Help  

Plan would earmark 25 percent for education

February 14, 2001
By: Aaron Cummins
State Capital Bureau
Links: SB 362

A St. Charles lawmaker took a page from late-night talk show host David Letterman in presenting a plan to earmark tobacco settlement money for education. Aaron Cummins has the story from Jefferson City--

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Democrat Ted House presented a Senate committee with his "Top 10 reasons to designate tobacco proceeds for public schools."

His bill would divide 25 percent of the 6.7 billion dollar tobacco settlement to school districts on a per student basis.

He says his plan would bring Missouri up to par with other states.

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Contents: House says Missouri ranks among the bottom of states in per capita funding for education.

House's plan would allow each district to decide how the money is spent.

Several Missouri teacher and school organizations voiced their support for the plan.

If it passes, each school district would receive nearly 2,000 dollars per student.

From the state capital, Aaron Cummins, KMOX-News.


Public school districts would get more money per student under a plan presented to a Senate committee today/Wednesday in Jefferson City. Aaron Cummins has the story--

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The proposal would earmark 25 percent of the state's 6.7 billion dollar tobacco settlement for education.

This year the state has just under 900,000 public school students in grades K-12.

That means districts would get a bonus of nearly $2,000 per student.

Julie Kase of the Missouri Parent Teacher Association testified in support of the plan.

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Contents: Kase says the extra money would provide better educational opportunities for children and, thus, graduates who are more productive members of society.

Under the plan, each district would be allowed to decide how it spends the additional money.

From the state capital, Aaron Cummins, KMOX-News.