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Lobbyist Money Help  

911 cell phone coverage inadequate

October 7, 2003
By: Zachary Ottenstein
State Capital Bureau

If you're driving down I-70, and call 9-1-1, help may NOT be on the way. Zack Ottenstein (Ah-ten-stine) has the story.


Story:
RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

Cell phone companies in Missouri are required to send local emergency dispatchers information enabling law enforcement to locate lost callers.

The problem is that local emergency services need to install technology capable of using the information to locate a caller.

Democratic Sen. Wayne Goode says voters will have to foot the bill.

Actuality:
RunTime:
OutCue:
Contents: Goode says that the tax will be on a county to county basis

Goode introduced a bill that would have levied a 50 cent tax to pay for the enhanced coverage.

And, Missouri voters defeated the bill most recently in 2002.

Now a task force is looking at ways to rework Goode's bill in time for the next legislative session.

Eventually federal law requires the carriers pay for the service, but that cost will likely be passed on to consuners.

From the state Capitol, I'm Zack Ottenstein.

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If you're driving down I-70 and call 9-1-1, help may NOT be on the way. Zack Ottenstein (Ah-ten-stine) has the story.

Story:
RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

Cell phone companies in Missouri are required to send local emergency dispatchers information enabling law enforcement to locate lost callers.

The problem is that local emergency services need to install technology capable of using the information to locate a caller.

Democratic Sen. Wayne Goode says voters will have to foot the bill.

Actuality:
RunTime:
OutCue:
Contents: Goode says that the tax will be on a county to county basis.

Goode introduced a bill that would have levied a 50 cent tax to pay for the enhanced coverage.

And, Missouri voters defeated the bill most recently in 2002.

Now a task force is looking at ways to rework Goode's bill in time for the next legislative session.

From the state Capitol, I'm Zack Ottenstein.