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State legislators want to lower speed limits in rural Missouri

February 26, 2004
By: Lindsay Shively
State Capital Bureau

Growing concern over driving deaths has lead some state legislators to say we need to slow down the speed limit on rural Missouri roads. Lindsay Shively has the story.

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Sen. John Cauthorn from Mexico is supporting a bill to reduce the default speed limit on rural county roads from 60 miles per hour to 50 miles per hour. Cauthorn says the current speed on these gravel roads is dangerous. Senator John Dolan from St. Charles says he shares this concern.

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Contents: Teenagers drive quickly on these roads. Farm equipment uses these roads and it is a dangerous situation.

Supporters of this change say this is vital legislation that needs to be passed this year. Those opposed to the bill say they are worried that reduced speeds would turn rural Missouri roads into speed traps, leading to an increase in speeding tickets. From the state Capitol, I'm Lindsay Shively.

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Date:02/26/04

By: Lindsay Shively

State Capital Bureau

State legislators Thursday argued whether or not lowering the speed limit on some rural county roads in Missouri would create unwanted speed traps. Lindsay Shively has the story.

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Sen. John Cauthorn from Mexico began the day asking to lower the default speed limit on certain rural Missouri roads from 60 miles per hour to 45 miles per hour. Sen. Delbert Scott from Lowry City said he was concerned about the effect of lowering the speed limit that much.

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Contents: We don't want to create speed traps.

Scott said he would prefer the speed limit be raised to 50 miles per hour from the proposed 45 miles per hour. Senators voted to adopt the ammendment early Thursday afternoon. From the state Capitol, I'm Lindsay Shively.