Ethics Commission Proposes to Wait to Rule on Campaign Finances
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Ethics Commission Proposes to Wait to Rule on Campaign Finances

Date: October 4, 2007
By: Carly Robertson
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: For the second time in a row, the Missouri Ethics Commission has put off a decision to demand exceeding campaign contributions be refunded in an open door meeting. Carly Robertson was at the meeting and has more.   RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

No decision was made in an open door meeting regarding a ruling that candidates will have to return contributions received during a six month period earlier this year.

The Commission first ruled on this case in September but after a lawsuit brought by the Missouri Republican party accusing that the Commission made a decision behind closed doors, the Commission re-tracked its ruling.

A unanimous decision was passed after head commissioner Warren Nieburg proposed waiting until the Commission has more information on how many candidates will be affected.

 

Actuality:  NIEBURG1.WAV
Run Time: 00:18
Description: "I would like to see staff come up with the numbers of the involved, the possible solution that would adhere to the Supreme Court's wishes."


Attorneys for both the Democratic and Republican parties testified in the meeting.

The Commission will revisit the issue after the October 15th filing date for candidates has passed.

From the state Capitol, I'm Carly Robertson.

 


Intro: Missouri political candidates will have to wait longer to know whether or not they will have to return campaign contributions received earlier this year.

Carly Robertson has more from the state Capitol.

RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

In a unanimous vote the Ethics Commission ruled to hold off on making a decision until the Commission has a better idea of how many candidates will be affected.

The Commission re-tracked its decision made earlier this year after the Missouri Republican Party brought a lawsuit against the Commission arguing it was in violation of the Sunshine Law.

Both political parties where represented at the open-door meeting.

Head Commissioner Warren Nieburg says he wants to make sure the ruling will be fair to all candidates.

Actuality:  NIEBURG2.WAV
Run Time: 00:08
Description: "And somewhere we have to come up with a course of action that is fair to both parties."

Estimates made at the meeting show as many as 140 candidates could be affected.

The Commission will revisit this issue after the candidates' October 15th filing deadline.

In the meantime, the Commission will make an in-depth investigation to see exactly how many candidates will be affected and how to best address the issue.

From the state Capitol, I'm Carly Robertson.

 


Intro: The Missouri Ethics Commission delayed action in deciding whether individuals will have to return excess contributions received earlier this year. The Commission re-tracked an earlier decision after the Missouri Republican Party accused it of violating the state's Sunshine law.

Carly Robertson was at the meeting and has more.

RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

The Ethics Commission voted to investigate further how many candidates will be affected and the amount of money that each individual may have to return.

A report will then be made to the Commission and from there a ruling can be made next month.

Although no decision was made, Head Commission Warren Nieburg says each candidate should have the chance to explain the reasoning behind the excess funds.

 

Actuality:  NIEBURG3.WAV
Run Time: 00:27
Description: "If we are going to adhere to an individual who has exceeded campaign finance contribution limits, then there were ways in the past and there ought to be ways in the future that he could have an opportunity to get right or explain why he couldn't as a legitimate hardship issue."


Over 100 candidates including Governor Matt Blunt are in jeopardy of having to return excess funds.

Blunt faces having to give back more than $3 million dollars in excess contributions.

From the state Capitol, I'm Carly Robertson.