Committee passes bill to provide cervical cancer vaccine
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Committee passes bill to provide cervical cancer vaccine

Date: April 11, 2007
By: Kevin Gehl
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: Cervical cancer vaccinations may soon be provided by the state. Kevin Gehl (GAIL) has more from the state capitol. RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

Representative Sam Page says that all young women should be given access to the vaccine against cervical cancer.

 
Actuality:  PAGE7.WAV
Run Time: 00:07
Description: This is the first cancer immunization and one of the biggest health care developments of the decade.


The democrat from St. Louis County sponsors House Bill 802, which requires health insurance companies to pay for HPV vaccinations in Missouri.

But Page explains that insurance limitations would not stop the vaccine from reaching children.

 
Actuality:  PAGE5.WAV
Run Time: 00:06
Description: The state would be responsible for supplying the vaccine to children without health insurance. 


With only five weeks remaining in the legislative session, the bill's chances are dim.

From the state capitol, I'm Kevin Gehl.

 


Intro: A house bill providing cervical cancer vaccinations hits close to home for its sponsor. Kevin Gehl (GAIL) sat down with the state representative in Jefferson City. RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

Representative Sam Page says that cervical cancer should be a serious concern for Missouri's young women. And as a practicing physician, Page has seen the problem first hand.

Actuality:  PAGE2.WAV
Run Time: 00:15
Description: As a doctor, Page has been forced to tell women with cervical cancer that he cannot treat their disease.

The democrat from St. Louis County sponsors House Bill 802.

The bill allows young women to receive cervical cancer vaccinations, paid for by insurance companies and the state.

But with just 5 weeks left in the legislative session, the bill's chances are dim.

From the state capitol, I'm Kevin Gehl.