West Nile Threat Prominent Through October
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West Nile Threat Prominent Through October

Date: September 20, 2007
By: Courtney Cox
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: A Missouri woman died last week due to infection caused by the West Nile virus. While summer is coming to an end, the threat of mosquito bites, and West Nile Virus is prominent until the end of October. Courtney Cox has more from Jefferson City.

 

RunTime: OutCue: SOC A Missourians risk of contracting West Nile Virus is rare, but it does exist. 30 cases have been reported for the year,including the death of a St. Louis woman last week. Dr. Howard Pue is the State Public Health Vetrinarian. He says that Missourians should acknowledge the risk. 
Actuality:  PUE1.WAV
Run Time: 00:21

Description:"If you get a lot of mosquito bites, ya know, over a period of several weeks or months or whatever, then obviously the risk increases. It's just a game of numbers. It's like rolling dice. Sooner or later the wrong combination is going to come up and you can get bitten by a mosquito.And it just takes one mosquito - the wrong one, to get West Nile Virus."

The risk of getting bit increases at dusk and dawn.

Pue says that it is important to use precaution, such as wearing protective clothing or using repellent to safeguard yourself.

From the state capitol, I'm Courtney Cox.


 


Intro: The death of a Missouri woman last week has brought to light the risk of West Nile Virus. Health officials are saying the risk of contracting West Nile is rare, but it does exist. Courtney Cox has more from Jefferson City.

RunTime:
OutCue: SOC
Although only three to five percent of Missouri's mosquitos are thought to be infected with the West Nile virus, the threat is real.
 
This according to Dr. Howard Pue, the State Public Health Veterinarian.

Actuality:  PUE2.WAV
Run Time: 00:09
Description: "West Nile is never going to go away. It will always be here. Again, people need to be aware that mosquitoes can transmit disease." 

Pue encourages Missourians to use repellents and wear protective clothing to decrease their risk.

The state has seen 30 cases this year, including the death of a St. Louis woman last week.

While summer is coming to an end, mosquitoes pose risk well into October.

From the state capitol, I'm Courtney Cox.