High Security at State Capitol is Nothing New
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High Security at State Capitol is Nothing New

Date: January 15, 2008
By: Amy Becker
State Capitol Bureau

Intro: The State of the State address gives the Governor the chance to outline his goals and promises for the new year.  But the night also welcomed additional security including bomb sniffing dogs to the capitol. Amy Becker has more from Jefferson City.

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Two hours prior to Blunt's State of the State address, a black lab named Durango is busy sniffing in every nook and cranny of the capitol.  He is looking for explosives.

According to Missouri Capitol Police Chief Todd Hurt, the additional security and implementation of explosive detecting canines was not because of Blunt's State of the State address.  Hurt says the increase in security was not a request by the Governor but rather a request by the police force itself.

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Description: We made some requests to the General Assembly to increase security.  Our request in total was about $1.1 million.

Even though the Capitol Police did not get everything they requested, their staff has doubled and they received two more bomb detecting dogs that will be used for future state events.

The extra security comes a few weeks after Blunt security shoved a Kansas City reporter out of their way. 

Reporting from the state Capitol, I'm Amy Becker, KMOX News.

Intro:  Walking through the halls of Missouri's state capitol, it is not unusual to find one or two armed police officers.  Blunt's State of the State address upped the ante with more security plus bomb sniffing dogs.  Amy Becker has more from the state capitol.

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According to Missouri Capitol Police Chief Todd Hurt, the extra security and canines were not a request by the Governor. 

Hurt says the additional security was made possible after the General Assembley appropriated more funds and agreed for the doubling of security at the state capitol. 

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Description: Our mission is to protect the visitors, the state employees, the school children that come here quite often to the capitol, we don't offer any more services to one person than the other.

 

Hurt says bomb sniffing dogs have been used in previous state addresses and will more than likely become a common prescence at future state events.  Reporting from Jefferson City, I'm Amy Becker.